Thursday, June 21, 2018

Landscape re-imagined yet again

Watercolor & pencil on Moulin du Roy
56 x 76 cm paper. Julie Clarke (c) 2018
I did this drawing about two weeks ago. Since then I've had a break and have knitted two scarves, raked, picked up and bagged thousands of Autumn leaves that have fallen from the Plane Tree that overlooks my unit. I've walked twice a day, trying to keep up the discipline and done numerous other things. I'm happy to report that I began a new drawing this morning. Back to a face in the landscape. I will post it when it's finished. I hope all my followers and Google + folks are well and those in Melbourne coping with the cold weather.

Tuesday, June 5, 2018

Landscape reimagined

Julie Clarke (c) 2018
This is a pencil, acrylic paint and watercolor drawing on 56 x 76 cm, 300 gsm, Moulin du Roy (France), acid free, watercolor paper.  I'm injecting neon (florescent color) into the landscape as a way of bridging city and country and making the idea magical in some way. It's also my attempt to address spring even though winter has just begin in Melbourne.

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Julie Clarke drawing this week: Neon

Neon. Julie Clarke (c) 2018

Flurescent pencil and acrylic paint on 56 x 76 cm, 300 gsm Moulin du Roy (French) Watercolor paper. Neon, is nature reimagined. I apologize for the quality of the digital photograph.

Sunday, May 27, 2018

MIKE PARR: PREMATURE BURIAL/DARK MOFO


Some images remain fixed in your psyche, forever embedded like a sharp steel instrument pierced through the eye to your brain. Those images are not always about body horror as depicted in film genre, but often generated by psychological fears. One such film I saw when I was a young person and I've never forgotten was  Premature Burial (Roger Corman, 1962) in which the main protagonist Guy Carrell (Ray Millan) suffered from cataleptic attacks occasioning him to have a pulse so faint that he might be considered dead. His very real fear was that he may be buried alive. Paranoid about his predicament he constructs a coffin with what he considers fail safe devices so that he can continue to breathe whilst underground and a communication device to herald help for his obviously desperate situation. The conclusion to the film is terrifying.
When I heard that Australian performance artist Mike Parr intends to have himself buried alive beneath the bitumen below Macquarie Street, Hobart on 14 June this year as part of Dark MOFO I immediately thought of Premature Burial and the psychological fears that undertaking such a task may invoke. Of course it's not the same because Parr will be interred in a steel container measuring 4.5 x 1.7 x 2.2m. It will contain a fan forced air supply and he will have water, but no food, a meditation stool and sketching materials.
Parr will be underground for three days and as such immediately invokes Christian scripture, especially Corinthian 15:4 that states Jesus Christ was 'raised on the third day'. Contentious always is whether Christ was dead and raised up by God or whether he was still alive when placed in the tomb and walked out of his own volition having survived his ordeal on the cross. Parr's interrment evokes this idea of death and resurrection and that other political word 'internment' which refers to those refugees interned in substandard accommodation in Australian detention centers with little to do except ponder their dire situation. Parr who will be alive underground as the traffic passes over him creates an interesting proposition since we, the general public will not be able to see what he is actually doing and as such will draw upon our own possible fears of claustrophobia even though Parr is adept at remaining still and controlling his mind. We really cant help projecting our own anxiety onto others.
Performance artists use their own bodies as art material and rely on the audience witnessing their performance. In this case those present will only see Parr's entry into the underground encasement and his departure from it. I'm almost certain that Parr's entrance and exit will be surrounded by the spectacle of the audience, which may be considered part of the performance.
Parr addressed the absence of the artist's body in relation to an artwork early in his career in his performance Dream 2 (The Lights of Empedocles) 1982 he installed a blue chair from his artwork Parapraxis 1 in the bedroom of a friend and turned the blue light it on and off by remote control, suggesting simultaneusly the artists presence and absence.
We live in a society that generally does not freely discuss death, so in this sense Parr's performance is timely in that it asks us to contemplate our own death and burial. I won't go into it here but I can't help but think of other 'heroic' males in the public eye such as Todd Sampson and his Body Hack documentaries in which he pushes the boundaries of what the body can do. It will be interesting to see some of the discussion around Parr's performance. I for one look forward to it.

Julie Clarke (c) 2018

Friday, May 25, 2018

SOFTER DRAWINGS

Pencil and acrylic paint. Julie Clarke (c) 2018
Watercolor and pencil. Julie Clarke (c) 2018
What a weird few weeks. I was totally freaked out in the Cancer Clinic at St. Vincent's Hospital last week having a black mole with uneven edges checked out by a Dermatologisgt. Thankfully it isn't a melanoma, but the message from the specialist as always is that you should have any suspect moles checked by a professional. Anyway, I've done a few more drawings and they appear softer than previous ones. I'm happy with the way my work is progressing and have had some positive feedback from friends on Facebook. These four drawings are on 56 x 76 cm, 300 gsm Moulin du Roy (French) water color paper, however I used some acrylic paint on two of them and water color on the last (second one pictured above). Again, I apologize that I cannot photograph these works in rectangles with my mobile phone. But you get the idea.
Pencil and acrylic paint. Julie Clarke (c) 2018
Pencil and acrylic paint. Julie Clarke (c) 2018


Thursday, May 10, 2018

Like Bliss

The past few weeks have found me at Specialist and Doctor's appointments. Blood test, influenza vaccine, etc. ad nausium. On a happier note I celebrated my birthday and that of my son and friends and received beautiful Moulin du Roy smooth paper as a present. We in Melbourne are feeling a small taste of Winter with the temperature plummeting over the last two days and wind and rain last night, which woke me up at 3.37am and I couldn't get back to sleep again so worked on my lastest drawing which I will show you when it's complete. In the meantime I've done three drawings that are rather brighter than the previous ones and as Melbourne artist Enza Bennincasa said of one of them 'they are like bliss'. See what you think. The actual drawings are much brighter in the flesh, my camera hasn't exactly captured their vibrancy. I apologize for the fact that I cannot align my camera to the image, thus borders are rather wonky.
Color pencil on 38 x 56 cm, 300 gms Moulin du Roy (French) paper.
Julie Clarke (c) 2018
Color pencil on 38 x 56 cm, 300 gms Moulin du Roy (French) paper.
Julie Clarke (c) 2018
Color pencil on 38 x 56 cm, 300 gms Arches (French) W/C paper.
Julie Clarke (c) 2018

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Latest drawings

I've been so absorbed with drawing for about four hours per day as well as doing twice daily walks, seeing people and other domestic duties I've all but forgotten to post on the blog. Anyway, here are some of my latest drawings.
Pencil on 38 x 56cm, 185gsm Arches (France) paper.
Julie Clarke (c) 2018
 
Pencil on 38 x 56cm, 185gsm Arches (France) paper.
Julie Clarke (c) 2018
Pencil on 38 x 56cm, 185gsm Arches (France) paper.
Julie Clarke (c) 2018
Pencil on A3 sized paper.
Julie Clarke (c) 2018

Sunday, April 1, 2018

GRAPHITE DRAWINGS BY JULIE CLARKE 2018

Graphite on 30 x 50 cm, 300 gsm paper. Julie Clarke (c) 2018
Graphite on A3, 300 gsm paper. Julie Clarke (c) 2018